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Megalodon teeth
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Multi-colored St Marys River Megalodon tooth.
L: 4.22   W: 2.85
Species: C. Megalodon
Location: St. Marys River, Georgia

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Pictures: 1 2
Multi-colored St Marys River Megalodon tooth.
Location: St. Marys River, Georgia
L: 4.22   W: 2.85
umplutura
Megalodon teeth
umplutura
Sciencifitic classification

Chondrichthyes
Lamniformes
Otodontidae
Parotodus
P. benedini

Location: USA, New Zealand, Australia, Japan

Temporal range: Oligocene to early-Pliocene

   P. benedini is a lamnoid shark known from large (~6 cm long), robust teeth. The teeth are similar to those of mako sharks, especially to those of the common, extinct mako species called Isurus hastalis, which had comparably sized teeth. The crowns of the teeth are small and crown like. Upper anterior have broad crowns with a concave labial face, while lower anterior teeth have more narrow crowns, with a convex labial face. However, the lower anterior teeth have in exchange thicker and more massive crowns, than the upper anterior teeth. The posterior teeth don't show a significant variation, they all have large roots and low, very oblique crowns. The root lobes of anterior teeth are circular in cross section. Benedini teeth are very rare, in the Lee Creek Mine formation, 17,000 shark teeth are known, but only six belong to Benedini.

   The ecology of this animal is poorly known, although we can suggest that the teeth had a different purpose than the one in modern sharks. They were rather comparable to the ones of mosasaurs and killer whales, that means a puncture and tear strategy, causing blunting wounds.

   There are different estimates for P. benedini, based on C. carcharias data. Using the enamel height, P. benedini's size can be estimated at 4.7 m. Using the measured upper tooth row length yields a total length of 6.5 m. Adding spaces between the tooth would increase the tooth row length by 17% (assuming a spacing comparable to the modern great white shark), yielding a total length of 7.6 m for the animal.

   Published weight estimates for the lower end range from 928 to 1,066 kg, and estimates for the higher end range from 4,118 to 4,822 kg. Teeth from private collections indicate specimens 20% longer than the studied ones.

   During time, the teeth of P. benedini got larger and more robust. The ones known from the Oligocene are quite small, but teeth from younger periods are larger and more robust. They likely did so, because marine mammals (which likely made up a great part of P. benedini's diet) got larger and more diverse within the time.

Phylogenetic position

   P. benedini was a lamnoid, which was first referred to Isurus, because of superficial similarities, it however was later proposed to be an own Genus, because fine details separate these taxa. A detailed analysis has shown that P. benedini was more a relative of Otododus and Carcharocles, than a relative of lamnidae members like Isurus.
L: 2.97   W: 1.93
Species: Parotodus Benedini
Location: Savannah, Georgia

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Pictures: 1 2 3 4
Sciencifitic classification

Chondrichthyes
Lamniformes
Otodontidae
Parotodus
P. benedini

Location: USA, New Zealand, Australia, Japan

Temporal range: Oligocene to early-Pliocene

   P. benedini is a lamnoid shark known from large (~6 cm long), robust teeth. The teeth are similar to those of mako sharks, especially to those of the common, extinct mako species called Isurus hastalis, which had comparably sized teeth. The crowns of the teeth are small and crown like. Upper anterior have broad crowns with a concave labial face, while lower anterior teeth have more narrow crowns, with a convex labial face. However, the lower anterior teeth have in exchange thicker and more massive crowns, than the upper anterior teeth. The posterior teeth don't show a significant variation, they all have large roots and low, very oblique crowns. The root lobes of anterior teeth are circular in cross section. Benedini teeth are very rare, in the Lee Creek Mine formation, 17,000 shark teeth are known, but only six belong to Benedini.

   The ecology of this animal is poorly known, although we can suggest that the teeth had a different purpose than the one in modern sharks. They were rather comparable to the ones of mosasaurs and killer whales, that means a puncture and tear strategy, causing blunting wounds.

   There are different estimates for P. benedini, based on C. carcharias data. Using the enamel height, P. benedini's size can be estimated at 4.7 m. Using the measured upper tooth row length yields a total length of 6.5 m. Adding spaces between the tooth would increase the tooth row length by 17% (assuming a spacing comparable to the modern great white shark), yielding a total length of 7.6 m for the animal.

   Published weight estimates for the lower end range from 928 to 1,066 kg, and estimates for the higher end range from 4,118 to 4,822 kg. Teeth from private collections indicate specimens 20% longer than the studied ones.

   During time, the teeth of P. benedini got larger and more robust. The ones known from the Oligocene are quite small, but teeth from younger periods are larger and more robust. They likely did so, because marine mammals (which likely made up a great part of P. benedini's diet) got larger and more diverse within the time.

Phylogenetic position

   P. benedini was a lamnoid, which was first referred to Isurus, because of superficial similarities, it however was later proposed to be an own Genus, because fine details separate these taxa. A detailed analysis has shown that P. benedini was more a relative of Otododus and Carcharocles, than a relative of lamnidae members like Isurus.
Location: Savannah, Georgia
L: 2.97   W: 1.93
umplutura
Megalodon teeth
umplutura
This tooth has a nice wavy shape throughout the blade. Deformed shark teeth are caused by a genetic tooth disease and it is pretty common among sharks. It's the nicest deformed meg tooth that I've seen.
L: 3.28   W: 2.53
Species: Carcharocles/Carcharodon Megalodon ‭(‬Big tooth‭)
Location: Savannah, Georgia

Teeth pictureTeeth pictureTeeth picture
Pictures: 1 2 3
This tooth has a nice wavy shape throughout the blade. Deformed shark teeth are caused by a genetic tooth disease and it is pretty common among sharks. It's the nicest deformed meg tooth that I've seen.
Location: Savannah, Georgia
L: 3.28   W: 2.53
umplutura
Megalodon teeth
umplutura
   The Cosmopolitodus Xiphodon is the broad-form extinct Giant White shark. Cosmopolitodus Xiphodon teeth are similar to the Cosmopolitodus Hastalis teeth, except the crowns are broader, and the roots are more compressed. Often, it looks as if the enamel goes all the way to the mesial and distal ends of the root. This gives them a very broad appearance. This is the largest of the Cosmopolitodus lineage. It appeared in the Miocene and became extinct in the mid-Pliocene. Teeth from these predators can reach sizes over 3 inches. This top predator became extinct just as the first modern Great White sharks appeared. This is probably not a coincidence; they would have probably lived in the same environments and had the same food source, and therefore competed. The modern Great White with serrated teeth would have had an advantage over the Cosmopolitodus Xiphodon with non-serrated teeth.

   This Mako tooth is the CROWN JEWEL of my shark teeth collection. Mako teeth at this size and being 100% natural is very rare. It so massive that I call it MEG JR. The modern Great White shark would have been dwarfed by the Cosmopolitodus Xiphodon shark who owned this tooth. If this tooth was owned by Garry Dye he would have post this tooth on the Best of Best page.
L: 3.34   W: 2.25
Species: Cosmopolitodus Xiphodon (broad-form)
Location: Savannah, Georgia

Teeth pictureTeeth picture
Pictures: 1 2
   The Cosmopolitodus Xiphodon is the broad-form extinct Giant White shark. Cosmopolitodus Xiphodon teeth are similar to the Cosmopolitodus Hastalis teeth, except the crowns are broader, and the roots are more compressed. Often, it looks as if the enamel goes all the way to the mesial and distal ends of the root. This gives them a very broad appearance. This is the largest of the Cosmopolitodus lineage. It appeared in the Miocene and became extinct in the mid-Pliocene. Teeth from these predators can reach sizes over 3 inches. This top predator became extinct just as the first modern Great White sharks appeared. This is probably not a coincidence; they would have probably lived in the same environments and had the same food source, and therefore competed. The modern Great White with serrated teeth would have had an advantage over the Cosmopolitodus Xiphodon with non-serrated teeth.

   This Mako tooth is the CROWN JEWEL of my shark teeth collection. Mako teeth at this size and being 100% natural is very rare. It so massive that I call it MEG JR. The modern Great White shark would have been dwarfed by the Cosmopolitodus Xiphodon shark who owned this tooth. If this tooth was owned by Garry Dye he would have post this tooth on the Best of Best page.
Location: Savannah, Georgia
L: 3.34   W: 2.25
umplutura
Megalodon teeth
umplutura
Nice orange meg with some white areas from a land site in Summerville, SC. Very rare condition for this specific site.
L: 4.97   W: 3.82
Species: C. Megalodon
Location: Summerville

Teeth picture
Nice orange meg with some white areas from a land site in Summerville, SC. Very rare condition for this specific site.
Location: Summerville
L: 4.97   W: 3.82
umplutura